That Bitch

“What a terrible restaurant!”
“What was wrong with it?”
“The food was awful. And the portions, so small!”

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Train

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Adverse Reaction

As expected, some people didn’t like last week’s comic strip about “allergies” to gluten in soy sauce. Guess what I found out since then? Soy sauce, even soy sauce made with wheat, contains no detectable gluten.

We sent a sample of soy sauce of the brands Kikkoman and Lima to an external laboratory to determine gluten levels. In both samples the gluten content was below detection limit of 5ppm (see report). According to a new European legislation, which will only be fully implemented in 2012, gluten-free foodstuffs should contain less than 20 ppm gluten. The FDA also proposes a limit of 20 ppm. This means that our two tested products may be considered as gluten-free soy sauce. Link

That doesn’t seem to stop adverse reactions like Mimi’s, above.

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Psycho-Somatic

all in your head, mind, psychological

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Unlearned

how not to do it

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Take the Pity

poor you

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Posture

Another sad story of my childhood.

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You Don’t Pay Attention

you don't pay attention to me

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Love Yourself

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Mnemonic Arbitrage

in the now

In the comments of this comic, I was introduced to the concept of mnemonic arbitrage by my friend Chung-chieh Shan.

André Aciman understands. In his essay, “Arbitrage,” Aciman introduces and explores the concept of “mnemonic arbitrage” (152), which ties into the idea of experiencing the moment to look back on it. Mnemonic arbitrage occurs when an individual “[firms] up the present by experiencing it as a memory, by experiencing it from the future as a moment in the past” (151). The individual “grounds the present on the past, and the future on the past recaptured” (152), such that riding a bike in Central Park is not ‘the moment.’ Instead, the moment is consecutively remembering the last time you rode the bike in Central Park and anticipating the fact that you will remember this current bike ride in Central Park. You are “not just remembering. [You are] remembering remembering” (152). Mnemonic arbitrage is a more complex idea than memory or nostalgia; it captures the human instinct to save memories for later.

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