Posting Art Online

There’s lots of insanely bad behavior online, but even more insanely good behavior. In particular, the gushing praise and encouragement people offer just about any creative effort posted online. Yes, there are trolls and savage critics, but far more people are kind than cruel. It’s no indication of quality, but it is very sweet.

Related comics here, here and here.

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12 comments to Posting Art Online

  • Bruno

    Sh*t being applauded? This remind me the movies of Michael Bay and the comics of Rob Liefeld!

    (this was a cruel behavior, I know…:P)

  • Terry Hancock

    Looks like crap to me.
    ;-D

  • charlie

    Is everyone familiar with Wm Blake’s great poem about Klopstock the German critic? The last two lines have one of the great rhymes in the English language.

  • Terry Hancock

    Seriously, though… I find that the tradition of fan art has encouraged an expectation that online support community will offer support for an artist by encouraging whatever they do. It’s like parents appreciating their children’s work: so it’s not very critical. The thing being complimented is the effort, not the artistic merit.

    So, it gets awkward when you start moving from amateur “fan art” to “semi-pro” or “professional” work (and what does that mean for free culture — is “Mimi & Eunice” “professional” or “amateur”?)

    How does a free culture artist establish an objective measure of the quality of their work? I think that’s what many artists want out of professional distribution — even more than they want money to live on. It’s that recognition that their work really is of value to society. (And not just poop after all).

    • So, it gets awkward when you start moving from amateur “fan art” to “semi-pro” or “professional” work (and what does that mean for free culture — is “Mimi & Eunice” “professional” or “amateur”?)

      Sounds like the `uncanny valley’ problem.

      Except, in this particular area, it seems like `stop fighting and just go with it‘ should actually be a workable strategy: I don’t see why it shouldn’t be possible to be a `professional fan-artist’. actually, I’m pretty sure `professional fan-art’ is already a significant market.

  • Nina

    Terry, there is NO WAY to establish an “objective measure of the quality of their work.” There just isn’t. Quality is in the eye of the beholder. The best approach is not to find an objective measure, which doesn’t exist, but to find the sort of people who like the work you do. They’re out there, even if they consist mostly of your Mom.

  • Joe

    Agree!!! Beauty is in the eye of the beholder.

  • Anwesha

    at the end of the day your comics make me laugh

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